Lake Wales Masonic Lodge #242



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Freemasonry never brought a tear; Never slandered man or woman; Never drew sword against an enemy; Never taught anyone to profane his Makers name; Never attempted to propagate a creed save its own; nor a religion save the universal, immutable religion. The cause of human progress and human freedom is our cause. Every subjects soul is his own.
- Jewels of Masonic Eloquence and Stories: Masonic Research Society Enid, Oklahoma, USA 1915

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Do you want to know how to become a Freemason? Here is some basic information which should address the question: "How do I become a Mason?"

Freemasonry has its lodges throughout the free world. You'll find Masons meeting in almost every town and village and - except where repressive governments make their existence difficult - they're readily found. None of these lodges was ever organized as a result of any type of 'missionary' work: they came into existence because a group of Masons wanted to share the friendship and fraternity with others in the area.

What is SO often misunderstood is a simple fact: there are few but important requirements to become a Freemason!

While they are stated in slightly different words in various jurisdictions (and a few jurisdictions may have one or two requirements beyond these), they basically are as follows:

  1. Being a man, freeborn, of good repute and well-recommended;

  2. A belief in a Supreme Being;

  3. Ability to support one's self and family;

  4. Of lawful age; and

  5. Come to Freemasonry of their "own free will and accord".

Freemasonry is an initiatic experience. You can't become a Mason by reading a book or by hanging out on the internet.

Let's examine the requirements for becoming a Mason individually:

Being a man, freeborn, of good repute and well-recommended


Masonry began as a male organization. There are women's groups and groups of mixed male-female membership who use rituals similar to that of the major body of Freemasons throughout the world. Some of these groups receive acknowledgement (but not 'recognition') due to their adherence to high moral principles etc. Check our list of regular/recognized Grand Lodges here


The requirement of being "freeborn" harkens back to the earliest days of Freemasonry. It became a requirement since only those free from indentured service as an apprentice or bondsman (as many were in 17th century England, for example), could truly make decisions for themselves.


Being of good repute is another essential requirement. Masons do not wish to encourage membership by those whose actions would stain the reputation of the fraternity. In some jurisdictions this is specifically stated but in all, it is practiced!


A well-recommended person is one for whom another is willing to vouch. Those who become Freemasons have been recommended by a proposer and then examined by lodge members to ensure that the candidate will benefit from his membership.


Belief in a Supreme Being



The major 'bone of contention' for some detractors, Masonry does not attempt to define or delineate how a person should pray or to whom worship should be addressed.


The term "Great Architect of the Universe" (or "Grand Architect of the Universe") is used to permit offerings of prayer in a non-offensive manner regardless of the varied religious beliefs of those present. All Masons understand this concept and when a prayer is said in lodge (a blessing before a meal, a word of prayer for the sick, for example), they understand that regardless of the person speaking the words or the usual form of prayer of others present, the prayer is addressed to their Supreme Being.


Once a candidate professes such belief, no further investigation or interrogation is made. This fact stymies Freemasonry's detractors who seem to be constantly engaged in wars of 'religious correctness' and who consequently wind up in contradiction with each other as a result.


Although not specifically stated by all jurisdictions, this 'requirement' comes from a time when many would join fraternal organizations in the hope there would be financial and other benefits available for them in their old age. Masonry did want to become a benevolent association and thus the requirement appeared. Now, this is important to ensure that those who seek membership understand the priority of Freemasonry is secondary to religious and family obligations!